Skip to main content

About your Search

20130223
20130223
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
formidable. can you win back the white house of hillary clinton is a nominee? >> sure. she is formidable, -- >> she is popular. >> whoever is the nominee would have to make the case of, do we want policies of the past or something fresh? >> that is the message. >> if you like, do not stop thinking about tomorrow is when bill clinton was talking about with fleetwood mac. maybe it is time to put somebody new in. >> folder you today? >> i am 45. >> you will be 47. hillary clinton will be about 70 years old. big difference. >> bobby jindal is in his 40's. a great speech last month from kissinger who can still look for a great punchline. we were so impressed. i said to the person sitting next to me, he realized that bobby jindal and i combined are still younger and henry kissinger. >> one thing i was struck by during the campaign, governor romney was a transitional figure between an older generation, baby boomers generation and the 40 somethings. they increasingly dominate gop politics. one of those figures as paul ryan. you talk to him a lot. is his future in the house or do you think he wan
that for the republican primaries, like santorum, he was much more in sync with that than senator clinton was. obviously senator santorum did not have the formidable apparatus that hillary clinton had. >> do you think that it had -- >> what do we know about the republican party? what do we know about mitt romney? [laughter] >> i think that is a testament. he did not begin this with a national or geographical or ideological base. in those debates, through skill, he took positions that people disagreed with like healthcare, but he given is the republican party that he had the qualities that he wanted to be the nominee. >> every week it was the new whack a mole. we went from perry to gingrich. >> herman cain was next. >> and then he blew up at the bloomberg debates. who were these? who were they? it seems like it was the same percentage of the electorate. >> governor perry was formidable. senator santorum -- anyone who underestimates him -- so much of running for president, the guys and gals who work the hardest -- senator santorum has the work ethic. >> the minute you say that, oh, that is right. [laught
. finally it was clinton who made nature of the commission. >> carter appointed me when i left his education. he appointed me to the commission. >> host: at what point did it become clear that agency would become permanent in a sense? >> guest: after the first year when the report stated, with the commission did with instead of sitting down and saying okay, they did some hearings. the major powers the commission hide a point not in the book continues the most important thing about the commission. it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to you. the civil rights problems people had said they could not get anyone to pay attention. not just local people, but the federal government. they would write letters and nobody would pay attention. the civil rights commission decided. listen to these people and see what they have to say and they have the power of the statue to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said the reason i want to get it passed by congress is because my attorney general tells me that's the only way they can subpoena anybody. given what the problems are, some people
primary dollars. >> you guys had the luxury near primary were you had these clinton donors who have never given money. and suddenly they could max out to you for the first time. >> the biggest difference is they had someone who is not going to take further financing versus mccain who was a setback if you need the ability to write unlimited money. >> which are primary site -- there is nobody who had a fundraising list. is that fair to say, not? >> there were some. >> so our theories are in the spirit that i know these guys made the decision to spend money early. that's the power of the comments. so during the period where we face this challenge, we did a few things and so we used the money we are raising and big chunks and high bar indeed be independent expenditure, which that probably occurred to me that timetable up. the other thing going on were super pacs and at that moment would be a lot of super pac activity. but we needed the super pacs and also during the period, the governor signed off on a $20 million love that allowed us to use primary money to pay back the general money. and so
. spielberg i think may win. you know who he had going to bat for him? bill clinton. >> that's big. >> they called out the big dog. so it may happen. it may happen. >> david edelstein, great to have you with us. >> thank you. >> looking forward to a big sunday night show. "the rachel maddow show" starts right now. good evening. >> good evening and happy weekend to i don't. >> dwlou too, my friend. >> thanks to you at home as well for joining us this hour on a friday. listen, neither the house nor the senate is in session. all the governors of the country are locked in closed door governor association meetings. the president is talking to the prime minister of japan without any of us getting to listen in. this is the kind of day that shouldn't have any news in it at all. but fridays apparently are the new mondays, or at least the new day in which there is always a lot going on in the news. so it turns out on a friday, again, we have a ton to get to in the news. including a story tonight that we have been covering for months that now looks like it is about to blow wide open into a na
to arthur's face. finally it was clinton who made me to share thet commission. >> host: president carter appointed you? co >> guest: carter appointed me in the new department oftion. education.he a web-based teaching and he appointed me to the commission. >> host: up a point did it become clear to be a?ncy d >> guest: after the first year? when the reports they did, what the commission did with that iso sitting down and saying we aref just here. they did some hearings. the nature and power thers the commission has been appointed from the boat and to me is theii most important thing about the commission. but it's supposed to do is go outte and listen to what no onel else will listen to. to civil rights problems people hae that they could not get anyone to pay attention.not jus not just local people, but the federal government.vernm they would write letters, nobody would pay attention. the civil rights people decided they would listen to people and see if they had to say i had th power of the statute to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said the reason i t nt to get it passed congress e and said
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)